Hero #18

Our Blog

Technical insight, ideas and commentary from IP HQ

Posted on 28 July, 2017 by Riaan Ingram & Siddharth Dubey

How to Invalidate Result Cache in OSB 11g and OSB 12c using Java Callout

Result Caching is a very popular Oracle Service Bus (OSB) feature which is often used for performance improvements. It allows local caching of response payloads from external services. Too often these cached payloads become outdated and need to be cleaned or refreshed, but programmatically controlling the selective ‘cleaning’ or refreshing of these response payload caches remains a challenge.

Posted on 12 January, 2017 by Balbir Bhogal & Riaan Ingram

Using an OpenAPI specification in Oracle Service Bus 12c

A very important factor in governing API-led connectivity or an integration approach is the Contract First design approach. In this blog we will detail one approach to utilize the most common RESTful API contract standard, the OpenAPI Specification (formerly Swagger) in Oracle Service Bus 12c (OSB).

Posted on 9 March, 2016 by Kevin Henshall & Riaan Ingram

Importing types defined in an OpenAPI specification into Mule ESB

A mainstay of service-oriented integration is contract first design to accelerate development and facilitate a test driven development approach. When it comes to APIs the most widely accepted ‘contract’ definition standard is the OpenAPI specification, previously known as the Swagger Specification. In contrast the MuleSoft technology stack relies on the RAML specification, which is natively supported across its API Gateway and ESB products.

Due to the large base of tooling and community support that OpenAPI offers, you may prefer to make use of the OpenAPI standard to define your contracts instead of RAML. In this blog we will show you how to import the types defined in an OpenAPI definition into Anypoint Studio for development use in MuleESB.

Posted on 17 November, 2015 by Kevin Henshall

How to Configure OSB 11g for Key Based Authentication SFTP

In the IT systems landscape, using usernames and passwords for authenticating systems often causes lots of headaches such as password storage and retrieval, hardcoded or deployed passwords, password change frequency and impacts of password changes.

When it comes to SFTP (SSH File Transfer Protocol), a better option is using key pair based SFTP. This blog helps to outline the steps required when you want to configure the Oracle Service Bus (OSB) 11g to utilise key pair based authentication for SFTP (SSH File Transfer Protocol). For public key authentication, the SFTP server authenticates the connection with the public key of the OSB service.